Jan 16

SHOT SHOW: The 40th Anniversary of the SHOT Show Starts next week!

The 40th Anniversary of the SHOT Show starts next week in Las Vegas, and OFFGRID Survival will be there covering the latest and greatest gear and all the breaking news right from the show floor. […]

The post SHOT SHOW: The 40th Anniversary of the SHOT Show Starts next week! appeared first on Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills.

from Off Grid Survival – Wilderness & Urban Survival Skills Click Here for full article

Jan 16

The Dirt-Cheap, Frugal Way To Start Seeds

The Dirt-Cheap & Frugal Way To Start Seeds

Image source: Pixabay.com

It’s easy to go overboard when shopping for seed supplies. Not only is it exciting to start growing things again, but there are so many tempting products. If you’re not careful, starting seeds can become surprisingly expensive. But with a little planning, you can get your hands on everything you need at a low cost — or even for free.

Containers

Reusing, repurposing and making your own planting containers is one of the easiest ways to pinch pennies.

If you don’t mind transplanting your seedlings, all kinds of plastic food containers can be repurposed into pots: yogurt cups, cheese tubs, milk jugs, water/juice/soda bottles, plastic clamshell containers from purchased fruit and vegetables, or K-Cup coffee pods. Soft plastic containers have an advantage — when you’re transplanting, you can squeeze the soil and seedlings out, without worrying about injuring the seedlings or their roots.

Need Non-GMO Seeds? Get Them From A Company You Can Trust!

However, if don’t want to mess around with a bunch of different-sized pots (which can be a headache as far as positioning your grow lights), you can make seed flats out of larger containers. Foil containers with clear plastic lids are especially useful, because they will create a greenhouse-type effect. Rotisserie chicken trays, frozen cake pans, or trays from the deli section, used for family-sized meals like lasagna, work well.

If you prefer biodegradable pots so that you can avoid transplanting, there are free options for those, too. It’s easy enough to cut toilet paper/paper towel/wrapping paper tubes down to peat-pot size. You don’t really need a bottom on these. Paper egg cartons provide excellent individual seed pots, too — just cut the cups apart when you’re ready to plant. Or, if you’re looking for a project on a blustery winter day, you can fashion pots out of newspaper. There are lots of online tutorials with instructions. All you need is newspaper, a glass or small mason jar to roll the paper around, and tape.

Potting Mix

The Dirt-Cheap & Frugal Way To Start Seeds

Image source: Pixabay.com

The next step, of course, is filling your pots with a planting medium. While bringing in garden soil might be the cheapest option, this is the one item that you really should spend money on (one bag goes a long way). Garden soil might contain insects, weed seeds, or pathogens, and it’s likely too heavy and dense to have good aeration and drainage. If you really want to use garden soil, you should sterilize it by baking in your oven, and then amend it by mixing one part soil with one part peat moss and one part perlite or coarse builder’s sand.

You also can make your own soilless mix, which costs more than amending garden soil, but is still cheaper than buying the premixed stuff. A basic recipe is to mix together one part perlite with one part peat moss and one part ground sphagnum moss. Another recipe, posted at The Prairie Homestead, is to mix two parts coconut coir with one part perlite and one part sifted compost.

Seeds

The last essential product you need to start seeds is, well, seeds. If you don’t already save your own seeds from year to year, you might want to plan for that this season. If you buy seeds, you might have extras lying around that you didn’t plant in years past. It’s always best to test the viability of old seeds before planting them. The germination rate of seeds decreases over time.

The All-Natural Fertilizer That Doubles Your Garden Yield!

It’s easy to test the viability of seeds. Simply moisten a couple of layers of paper towels, and space out about 10 seeds of any one variety. Roll or fold up the paper towel and place in a plastic bag. Keep the bag in a warm, bright spot, and make sure the paper towel stays moist until the testing is done, which might take up to two weeks, depending on the type of seeds. Check every few days to see if any seeds have sprouted. If at least some sprout, it’s worth planting them — but make sure to plant extras to make up for the ones that won’t germinate.

Seed Tape

One last tip: if you love seed tape as much as I do, you can pinch pennies by making your own. All you need is toilet paper, homemade flour and water paste, and seeds. There are several online tutorials about how to make seed tape, and it’s another great project for a blustery winter day.

Gardening is already a frugal way to feed your family, but you can stretch your food dollars even further by starting seeds at an extremely low cost.

Do you have any more tips on how to save money while starting seeds? Share your secrets in the comments below:

Bust Inflation With A Low-Cost, High-Production Garden. Read More Here.

from Survival Gardening – Off The Grid News Click Here for full article

Jan 16

7 Heal-Anything Medicinal Plants You Can Grow Indoors

7 Heal-Anything Medicinal Plants You Can Grow Indoors

Marigold. Image source: Pixabay.com

There is absolutely nothing like having fresh medicinal plants that you can pick and use right on the spot, when you need them.

Plus, you can dry them, and then use a mortise and pestle to grind them and encapsulate your own medicinal plants. You know they were never sprayed with pesticides. And you know all about the nutrients that were fed to them.

You can grow them in decorative planters in the kitchen if you have the lighting for it.

Many people set up a multi-tiered rack that allows planter pots to be set at a forward-facing angle. This allows you to put the back of it against a wall, and the plants grow at a forward-facing angle.

Other people like to use wire hangers and hang the pots from a wall in rows or a pattern. If you’re going to do this, then test the strength of your wall.

If you have a sunroom or a sunroom-like area, these make great growing spaces, too.

Learn How To Make Powerful Herbal Medicines, Right in Your Kitchen!

Here are seven of the best medicinal plants you can grow indoors:

1. St John’s Wort. This plant will grow year-round with a grow light in the morning or evening to extend the growing hours of the day. If you find that it’s not flowering, then it may need longer hours of light.

7 Heal-Anything Medicinal Plants You Can Grow Indoors

St. John’s Wort. Image source: Pixabay.com

It’s a great-looking plant with attractive yellow flowers and can really brighten up a home.

Benefits:

  • May be as effective as some prescription medication for treating depression1.
  • Helps alleviate the symptoms of PMS and menopause2.
  • May help with the symptoms of ADD (attention deficit disorder)2.

2. Thyme. This is a hearty plant that can be used in cooking, as it’s one of the most popular herbs around. It’s hearty, grows pretty easily and doesn’t require much care at all.

Benefits:

  • Thyme has been shown to aid in the relief of chest and respiratory problems, including coughs, bronchitis and chest congestion3.
  • Thyme has been shown to have a strong antimicrobial activity, neutralizing such bacteria and fungi as Staphalococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli and Shigella sonnei4.

3. Sage. Its genus name, Salvia, means “to heal.” As long as you give it light, adequate water and good soil, you almost can’t kill it. Sage is one of the herbs that makes everyone look like they’ve got a green thumb.

7 Heal-Anything Medicinal Plants You Can Grow Indoors

Sage. Image source: Pixabay.com

Benefits:

  • May lessen the symptoms of Alzheimer’s 5.
  • Has been shown to lower both blood glucose and cholesterol5.

4. Parsley. Too many people think of parsley as a garnish on their plate. But parsley is one of the best green foods around.

It grows rather easily, and you shouldn’t have a problem so long as you keep its soil damp.

Benefits:

  • Can help with bad breath6.
  • Can help detoxify the brain of ammonia, thereby reducing the feelings of a hangover.
  • May be a potent anticancer agent and has been shown to be chemo-protective7.

5. Marigold. A truly unique and beautiful flowing medicinal, marigold will grow with only just a little bit of TLC needed.

Benefits:

  • The flowers have long been touted to posses near legendary anti-inflammatory properties that have shown to fight eczema and allergic reactions.
  • Relieves pain of arthritis.
  • Can be made into tinctures and ointments that have shown to sooth rashes, bed sores, diaper rash, sun burns and other types of burns.

6. Lavender. This is one of the most fragrant medicinal plants you can grow in your home. Lavender is a little more work to grow inside and it needs a little more space.

Benefits:

  • Put lavender in your pillow to have a restful sleep and avoid insomnia8.
  • Helps with nervousness, headache, stomach nerves, restlessness and stress8.
7 Heal-Anything Medicinal Plants You Can Grow Indoors

Image source: Pixabay.com

7. Echinacea. Here you have the granddaddy of all medicinal plants. It grows easily, as long as you give it a grow light.

Benefits:

  • Several studies show that Echinacea helps boost the immune10.
  • Echinacea has shown to be very promising in treating most any kind of infection, from sinusitis to vaginal yeast infections to ear infections10.
  • Shows promise in treating colon cancer and athlete’s foot10.

What plants would you add to the list? Share your tips in the section below:

If You Like All-Natural Home Remedies, You Need To Read Everything That Hydrogen Peroxide Can Do. Learn More Here.

hydrogen peroxide report

Sources:

  1. http://ift.tt/1NjIKxk
  2. http://ift.tt/2a5buff
  3. Kelm MA, Nair MG, Strasburg GM, DeWitt DL. Antioxidant and cyclooxygenase inhibitory phenolic compounds from Ocimum sanctum Linn. Phytomedicine 2000 Mar;7(1):7-13. 2000. PMID:12240.
  4. Bagamboula CF, Uyttendaeleand M, Debevere J. Inhibitory effect of thyme and basil essential oils, carvacrol, thymol, estragol, linalool and p-cymene towards Shigella sonnei and S. flexneri. Food Microbio 2004 Feb;21 (1):33-42. 2004.
  5. http://ift.tt/1gV9PF7
  6. http://ift.tt/1ZdNSs4
  7. http://ift.tt/2kyWdIf
  8. http://ift.tt/1mIjl2Q
  9. http://ift.tt/1dqTnjb

from Natural Health – Off The Grid News Click Here for full article

Jan 16

So Cold It Hurts: 6 Cold Weather Injuries and How to Deal with Them

It has been just over a week since Snowmageddon hit the east coast. The northeast was struck especially hard. We had a “bomb cyclone” snow storm followed by blistering cold … Read the rest

The post So Cold It Hurts: 6 Cold Weather Injuries and How to Deal with Them appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

from The Organic Prepper Click Here for full article

Jan 16

Our Prepping Goals for This Year

Our Prepping Goals for This Year As another year comes to an end it’s important for us to look back and reflect. The year 2017 was something amazing. It was really a disaster of a year in more ways than one. We faced some incredible cataclysmic disasters that changed the world forever. It was, by …

Continue reading

The post Our Prepping Goals for This Year appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

from SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central Click Here for full article

Jan 16

Survival Whistle

Survival Whistle You may find that signaling for rescue has fallen pretty low on your list of survival needs. When you hit the camping trail or you take that weekend to relax in the mountains there could be many more priorities. The funny thing about signaling for survival is that you are going to spend …

Continue reading

The post Survival Whistle appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

from SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central Click Here for full article

Jan 16

Acute Mountain (Altitude) Sickness

Acute Mountain (Altitude) Sickness Many preppers across the nation have a bugout plan that includes seeking shelter in national forests. The idea of running from threats in the urban world and getting to a place that is safer and less populated is a common plan. The bugout is far too unique to the person to …

Continue reading

The post Acute Mountain (Altitude) Sickness appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

from SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central Click Here for full article

Jan 16

How to Make Reverse Twist Two-Ply Natural Cordage

How to Make Reverse Twist Two-Ply Natural Cordage Cordage is a game changer. There is no getting around this fact. Just look at the explosion of paracord. You can find just about anything made of paracord and that is because people understand the usefulness of having paracord on hand. There is a big difference between …

Continue reading

The post How to Make Reverse Twist Two-Ply Natural Cordage appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

from SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central Click Here for full article

Jan 16

How To Install a DIY Pallet Wood Floor

How To Install a DIY Pallet Wood Floor I love starting new DIY home improvement projects, especially when you get to do some repurposing or upcycling! Whether you’re starting from the ground up with your own homestead, or just looking for an interesting way to spruce up your home, you’ll probably be considering some new …

Continue reading

The post How To Install a DIY Pallet Wood Floor appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

from SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central Click Here for full article

Jan 16

Concrete Canvas Shelters – Bug Out Housing?

Concrete Canvas Shelters – Bug Out Housing? This concrete shelter could be your answer to all your bug out worries! Cheap and very hide-able. Concrete Canvas Shelters (CCS) are rapidly deployable hardened shelters that require only water and air for construction. These make excellent bug out cabin/houses. They are cheaper than building one too. Concrete …

Continue reading

The post Concrete Canvas Shelters – Bug Out Housing? appeared first on SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central.

from SHTF Prepping & Homesteading Central Click Here for full article