Jul 18

Is Your Essential Oil Fake – And Your Seller Reputable? Here’s How To Find Out

Is Your Essential Oil Fake – And Your Seller Reputable? Here’s How To Find Out

Image source: Pixabay.com

 

When I first became interested in essential oils, I had plenty of questions. I wondered, “How do I know that the essential oils are 100 percent pure, as advertised?” And: “How much should I pay for 100 percent pure essential oils?”

Now that I have more experience with buying and using essential oils, I know what to look for before purchasing essential oils and how to determine their purity after I receive them. Here’s what I’ve learned:

1. Look at multiple retailers and thoroughly check out each of their websites.

Don’t just buy the first essential oils that you come across. Take the time to look at different companies and producers that sell the oils. Do this by carefully looking over their websites and how they present the essential oils. Here are some tips to help with online shopping for essential oils:

Does the seller’s website provide easy access to customer service by offering a phone number? 

This is important because it shows that the seller cares about their product and you as their customer. They should be there to answer any questions about their products and to address any potential problems with orders.

Does each essential oil have its own page or section where it clearly lists ingredients and offers information about the oil?

Is Your Essential Oil Fake – And Your Seller Reputable? Here’s How To Find OutI find this both important and helpful. All health products should have the ingredients listed both on the website and on the product itself. Also, for 100 percent essential oils, make sure the ingredients include only the oil and no other ingredients. If other ingredients are listed, then the oil is not 100 percent pure, and fillers have been added. Furthermore, look for the scientific name of the oil. For example, for peppermint essential oil, the ingredient label should say: 100 percent pure mentha piperita (peppermint oil). If it says anything else, the chances are high that it is not 100 percent pure.

Learn How To Make Powerful Herbal Medicines, Right in Your Kitchen!

When a seller openly offers information about the essential oil such as how it is cultivated, distilled, where it is manufactured, and how it should smell, it shows that they truly want to inform you about the product that they are offering.

Look for seller sites that offer blogs and DIY ideas on how to use the essential oils, too. Remember, the more detailed a seller’s site is, the more it shows their dedication to the product and to you as a customer.

Does the seller offer confirmed customer reviews and is there an option to leave a review yourself?

Reviews are everything these days and without them, I might not be inclined to buy a new product. Just by reading other customer’s reviews, you can determine if the essential oil is 100 percent pure and if the customer is happy with their purchase.

2. Know how much 100 percent pure essential oils should cost!

Beware of cheap essential oils. For the most part, 100 percent pure oils can be costly, so if it sounds too good to be true, then it probably is. Here are some tips for beginners to help learn how much each oil should cost.

Check out multiple sellers and compare

Is Your Essential Oil Fake – And Your Seller Reputable? Here’s How To Find Out

Image source: Pixabay.com

By comparing prices for essential oils from different sellers, and by following the above-listed tips for finding reputable sellers, you can learn about what the price range should be for each essential oil.

You will find that certain essential oils are extremely expensive and always will be in a pure form. For example, rose, jasmine and helichrysum, among others, are more expensive. The reasons for the extra cost can vary, but is most likely due to an oil’s source plant being rare, hard to grow, or that it just takes a significant amount of the plant to extract a small amount of oil.

Other essential oils will be mid-range in price, such as neroli, and some will be a little cheaper (lavender, for example) because they grow in such abundance and distracting the oil is an easier process.

Some reputable sellers will sell pre-blended versions of the more expensive oils. This is OK as long as the ingredients are listed as blended. Usually, the oil will be blended with a carrier oil, such as sweet almond oil. This is to help keep the oils affordable for customers.

3. After finding a reputable seller, how do you know which essential oils to start out with?

This is a common question, so I wanted to throw in that some sellers do sell starter kits. These kits will contain smaller bottles of popular oils so that you can try them out and get a feel for the ones that you like. This can help out with costs for a beginner trying to start a collection of essential oils.

How To Test Your Oils for Purity After You Purchase Them

1. There should not be any odors such as alcohol.

The oils should never have the smell of alcohol or any other chemical. Some companies will add alcohol as a cheap diluting agent and then try to pass it off as pure.

2. Pure essential oils should not be overly oily or greasy.

Though some oils are thicker than others in substance, essential oils are not exactly an oil. They are called this for lack of a better term, because they do not mix well with water. Test a drop by rubbing it between your fingertips. If it feels too greasy and does not absorb quickly, a carrier oil like olive oil might have been added to it. To further test it, here are several ideas:

3. The paper test

Drop a drop of the essential oil onto a piece of white printer paper. Let it dry. If it leaves a ring of residue behind, the oil is not pure. Pure essential oils will completely evaporate. (Since some oils have a color to them, the color might stain the paper, but there should not be a ring of residue after the oil evaporates.

4. The water test

Drop a few drops into your diffuser or a small container of water. The oil should not mix with the water, but instead float on top of the water until it fully evaporates. If it mixes with the water or makes the water a cloudy white color, the oil is not in pure form.

By starting out with these tips, you can be well on your way to becoming an experienced essential oil buyer and user!

What advice would you add on determining if an essential oil is pure? Share your tips in the section below:

If You Like All-Natural Home Remedies, You Need To Read Everything That Hydrogen Peroxide Can Do. Find Out More Here.

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Jul 17

Police Attacked: 3 Dead 3 Critically Injured in Baton Rouge

Multiple police officers were ambushed and gun downed in Baton Rouge, Louisianna… […]

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Jul 17

15 No-Cost Preps

15 Things You Can Do to Prep That Take Time, Not Money.

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Jul 16

Don’t Pee in My Cognitive Dissonance: PC Things We Aren’t Supposed to Talk About

Survival Saturday is  a round-up of the week’s news and resources for folks who are interested in being prepared.

This Week in the News

This week, the Survival Saturday round-up … Read the rest

The post Don’t Pee in My Cognitive Dissonance: PC Things We Aren’t Supposed to Talk About appeared first on The Organic Prepper.

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Jul 16

The Toxic Truth About Cinder Blocks Every Homesteader Should Know

The Toxic Truth About Cinder Blocks Every Homesteader Should Know

Image source: Rustoleum.com

Planning to add some raised beds to your homestead this year? Raised beds are excellent for those who need more compact gardens or those who have back or knee pain, as they eliminate the necessity of bending down to weed the rows.

Natural rock can be used to create raised beds. Think of the stone fences frequently seen throughout the countryside. Most of these barriers were constructed out of rocks gathered from the adjacent fields. Although you may not be able to gather enough rocks from your homestead alone, visiting with a local building contractor may allow you the opportunity to glean rocks from new construction sites for the amount needed for your project.

Of course, raised gardens also can be constructed out of lumber. Cedar is a popular choice, since it is resistant to wood rot and deters termites. Avoid using treated lumber of any kind. Treated lumber can harbor toxic chemicals that will leach into the soil, contaminating both the soil and plants grown in the affected soil. The same can be said for railroad ties and other scrap lumber of unknown origins.

In an effort to save time and money, many homesteaders have turned to using cinder blocks, new and reclaimed, to build raised beds on their property. Although cinder blocks are relatively easy to obtain, are simple to work with and last for years with very little maintenance, there are a few safety concerns that should be addressed.

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First, you must determine if you are working with true cinder blocks or cement blocks, as there is a difference in their composition. Cement blocks are made with Portland cement and aggregates. They are heavier and costlier on average, while cinder blocks are made with Portland cement and fly ash, a byproduct of the coal industry, and they are lighter in weight and most often cheaper to purchase.

The Toxic Truth About Cinder Blocks Every Homesteader Should KnowThe addition of fly ash to the Portland cement is the cause of concern. Fly ash is a byproduct of coal-burning electric plants. The ash is trapped and collected, then used as a partial substitute for Portland cement. While it is true that this process creates what is now considered a green building material, questions remain about how safe fly ash truly is. The coal itself contains many heavy metals and other substances known to be toxic. A considerable amount of these metals and substances remain in the ash and are subsequently found in the cinder blocks that are created from it.

Garden beds, framed with cinder block, may be fine for flowers and other nonedible plants, but be wary of using them to frame gardens that will be home to edible plants and medicinal herbs. There is the potential for toxic materials to leach from the cinder blocks into the soil. These materials have been known to affect cognitive ability, cause nervous disorders, contribute to increased cancer risks and have given rise to many general health complaints.

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There are some ways to safeguard yourself and your raised beds if you are concerned about the increased health risks from using cinder blocks.

1. Plant only in the actual garden space created by the cinder blocks. Do not plant edibles in the hollow chambers of the blocks. The roots of these plants are completely surrounded by the block and may absorb the higher amounts of toxic material leached into the soil from the fly ash.

2. If building a new bed, seal the blocks with a waterproof sealant on all surfaces. This may lessen the amount of leaching that occurs over time from watering and natural rainfall.

3. For a few seasons, grow cleansing plants, such as sunflowers. Some species of plants clean the soil by removing toxic materials from the soil, or at the very least neutralize them. At the end of the growing season it is best to destroy the plants. Adding the contaminated plant to the compost pile will only spread the toxic materials to a new location.

Do you garden with cinder blocks? What advice would you add? Share it in the section below:

If You Like All-Natural Home Remedies, You Need To Read Everything That Hydrogen Peroxide Can Do. Find Out More Here.

hydrogen peroxide report

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Jul 16

Preppers Personal Security Tips

A lot of people watch shows like Doomsday Preppers or T.V. series such as The Walking Dead and reach the inevitable conclusion that preppers are crazy and that emergencies and disasters are things that never happen in real life, not to them at least.

The fact of the matter is, preparedness goes well beyond Doomsday scenarios. In fact, “little things” such as getting ready for burglaries, having a well-equipped car and taking care of personal security are common sense, and they have nothing to do with asteroids, zombies or World War III.

In what follows I want to tackle the issue of personal security. If your spouse isn’t interested in preparedness, this is one of the issues you could mention without making yourself look crazy. Good people are victims of bad people each and every day… and this happens in first, second and third world countries alike.

Personal Security Tips for Preppers:

Step #1: Taking Care of the Little Things

I’m not going to bore you with stats about assaults, rape and street fights. You can find those online if you’re looking for a good scare, or if you need them to convince your spouse to listen to you. We all know that people are attacked every day and they don’t have to go to Afghanistan for it.

Everyone should have at least one self-defense item on them at all times. Now, I don’t know the laws where you live, so I’m just going to give you a list of things to choose from. I trust you will do your due diligence on what you can and cannot get:

  • a handgun
  • a folding knife
  • a stun gun
  • pepper/wasp spray
  • a tactical pen
  • a slingshot
  • a credit card knife

In Australia and Europe you’ll even have a hard time with pepper spray… but don’t let this discourage you from finding alternatives.

Step #2: Taking it To the Next Level. Your Car

Once you have at least one item with you at all times, it’s time you consider your transportation vehicle. Even if you don’t use it that often, what will you do if you’re going someplace out of town and you’re suddenly ambushed by a group of people. It happened to me onceand luckily they were kids who started hitting the car with their fists, so driving off fast was enough.

Keeping the law in mind, let’s see what some of the things you could fit in your car’s trunk are:

  • a rifle or a shotgun
  • a snow shovel (hint: this is practically mandatory for emergency situations, no one can accuse you that it’s a weapon)
  • a large knife
  • an axe
  • a machete
  • baseball bats
  • walking sticks

One of the things I bought for my car was a snow shovel. It can’t be considered a self-defense weapon because its purpose is to use it to get your vehicle out of snow and mud… but it can make a good back-up self-defense weapon in case I get attacked.

Step #3: Get a Dog

I’ve had dogs for the past 15 years and loved each and every one of them. All very loyal, though they didn’t get many chances to show it by defending me. There are plenty of breeds to choose from: German Shepherds, Dobermans, Rottweilers and even smaller ones such as beagles.

Step #4: Take Self-Defense Lessons

I should have put this at the top of the list but I realize a lot of people are lazy, and self-defense lessons take time, effort, patience and focus. Now, I’m no martial arts instructor but one thing I know is that if you don’t practice, you’re not going to get any results just by watching YouTube videos.

If you don’t have the time, consider ditching the gym for a month to try them. You’re going to get one heck of a cardio workout every time. Finding a self-defense class in your area is something that requires research, such as:

  • talking to people who’ve already taken one
  • watching YouTube videos with demos of each martial art to see what they look like and researching which ones are best for you
  • not assuming that a more expensive class has a better instructor
  • keeping in mind any medical issues you may have such as a bad back or bad knees
  • and, last but not least, finding an instructor who’s passionate about what he does

Step #5: Convincing Your Family to Do It

If your family isn’t receptive to prepping or their own personal security and well-being, if you feel they might be reluctant to the above suggestions, you should probably think and plan beforehand what to say.

Let me help you out by giving you some suggestions on how you can approach them:

  • Dig up old news of people being attacked in your town or city. This is very powerful proof that they can’t argue about.
  • Read the stats I was talking about in the beginning of the article and let them know that, even if the odds are small, it’s still important to be prepared.
  • Think what they are going to say and have comebacks. Some of their objections might be: “Oh, this will never happen to me!” or “Don’t worry, we live in a safe neighborhood!” or “I’m not going alone in unknown places at night so I don’t need this”.
  • Lead and they might follow. If they see you taking action, they might be inspired and follow your lead.

Stay safe,

Dan F. Sullivan

http://ift.tt/1LfLOcb

The post Preppers Personal Security Tips appeared first on American Preppers Network.

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Jul 16

Book Review: Zero Footprint

Private Military Contractor Book

Every once in awhile you need to stop and read a good book.  A book that will make you laugh, cry, and rethink howSurvival Book lucky you are not to be in war or working in one of these hostile nations.  The book Zero Footprint is one of those type of books.  Written by Simon Chase (aka Scott Charnick) and Ralph Pezzullo, the book details the life of a PMC (Private Military Contractor) in the modern era of Blackwater type mercenaries.

By Mark Puhaly, a contributing author to Survival Cache & SHTFBlog

The British Military

Scott Charnick spent 15 years in the British military, serving in Northern Ireland and overseas.  Before Sept 11th, he Private Military Contractorwas an executive security guard for very rich families such as those philanthropist John Paul Getty Jr. and Prince Aga Khan IV.

Now after I read Zero Footprint but before I wrote this review, I checked Amazon and a few other places and apparently some people are claiming the author, Scott Charnick (Simon Chase), stretched the truth and embellished quite a few stories in his book.  I do not know if it is true that he embellished stories and frankly, from a pure entertainment perspective, I enjoyed the book immensely either way.

Related: Book Review American Sniper

I was mad for a minute when I first read that some of the stories were embellished but with Hillary Clinton claiming to be shot at by snipers in Bosnia and Brian Williams claiming that his helicopter in Iraq was hit by an RPG, I guess I am used to people stretching the truth a little bit (Never let the truth get in the way of a good story).  Also, who knows, maybe the people who are trying to discredit him are from an embarrassed government trying to cover up that the CIA was trying to ship weapons to Libya through a British holding company.  Either way, Zero Footprint is great, fast paced, and you will not find yourself wishing there was more action.

Zero Footprint begins with the author growing up in a tough neighborhood in England and eventually finding his way into a choice between the military or jail.  From there his military adventures begin but Charnick would eventually get hurt and was discharged from her majesty’s service.  From there he fell into the executive security field and eventually landed in the Private Military Contractor role after 9/11.

The CIA Lies?

What I like about Zero Footprint is that there are some lighter moments that remind me of my time in Marine Corps Secret Armieswhere someone would say something in a dire moment and everyone would start dying laughing.  One of those moments came during the early stages of the Afghanistan war post 9/11 where Scott (the author) found himself working as a contractor for the CIA.  The CIA paid him and his mates in cash, a lot of cash.  The problem was how were they going to get all of that CIA cash back to the UK without paying 60% in taxes.  Their CIA contact (Michael S.) told Scott that he and his teammates should give their money to a stranger in Kabul who will call his cousin in Dubai and the money will be waiting for them once they landed in Dubai.  When Scott tries to sell that to his mates, they look at him like he is bonkers.  One of the guys starts yelling in his face “Are you fucking on drugs mate?  Who told you that?” – Scott responds “Michael S” and his mate says “Well, Michael lies for a living.”  I found that moment in the book particularly funny considering Michael S was a CIA agent.

Related: Book Review The Mission, The Men, and Me

The book has some sad moments as well.  When the bullets start flying in these hot spots, good people inevitably die.  Many of Scott’s friends die in conflicts with terrorists around the globe and each one has a devastating effect on his mental health and plays a role in the unwinding of romantic relationships which is detailed in the book as well.  I have several friends who are in the PMC contractor world and I think this book gives a good perspective on how it is not all fast pace action with your hair on fire.  A lot of what you do is very tedious work and sometimes you are not treated very well by the people you are protecting.

Overall

Overall, I think this book is worth the read.  The author does not take the politically correct tone when it comes to the middle east, he basically says it is all one big shit hole.  Which we all pretty much know.  Whether or not the book is a 100% accurate will be for someone else to research and comment on.  Either way, I really enjoyed the read.  The book was a page turner and the action was fast paced when it came up.  There might be a movie in the works based on Zero Footprint.  I would definitely go see that.

About Mark: Former Marine Reconnaissance Team Leader, Marine Infantry Officer, Cross Fit Coach, Endurance Athlete, and Survivalist.

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Jul 16

What did you do to prep this week?

Before we get started I’d like to thank Mr. Bill D, Peter W, Ray W, Kelly G, Mike B and Heather T for their generous donations this week. If you have found that this site has helped you to prep better and you would like to send a monetary contribution to say “thanks” then you can do that here.

Your thoughts, prayers and words of encouragement are very important too… and those cost nothing.

As you know I collect Mora Knives and this week I added two more to my growing collection the Morakniv Outdoor 2000 Fixed Blade Knife with Sandvik Stainless Steel Blade and a

Read the whole entry… »

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Jul 16

What did you do to prep this week?

Before we get started I’d like to thank Mr. Bill D, Peter W, Ray W, Kelly G, Mike B and Heather T for their generous donations this week. If you have found that this site has helped you to prep better and you would like to send a monetary contribution to say “thanks” then you can do that here.

Your thoughts, prayers and words of encouragement are very important too… and those cost nothing.

As you know I collect Mora Knives and this week I added two more to my growing collection the Morakniv Outdoor 2000 Fixed Blade Knife with Sandvik Stainless Steel Blade and a

Read the whole entry… »

from TheSurvivalistBlog.net RSS Feed Click Here for full article

Jul 15

Military Coup in Turkey: Martial Law Declared People take to The Streets

Turkey Army officers have seized power in Turkey and have declared a state of martial law. Military equipment has been moved into the capital and tanks are blocking roads throughout Istanbul in an attempt to over through the Islamist government. […]

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